“Requested Materials” – Really?

June 20, 2008

Requested Materials: Credit xlucasI receive a lot of press kits from bands wanting to be featured here (and I’m just talking about print kits – let’s leave online submissions out of this). I hate to think of how many larger sites and print pubs are getting. It’s hard enough sorting through it all, but what really makes me insane is when I get a press kit with “REQUESTED MATERIALS” stamped, written, or whatever on the envelope.

I almost always think the same thing – “Yeah f*cking right – I didn’t request this sh*t!” Generally, it either goes into the trash without being opened, or it goes to the bottom of my review pile (and to put it simply, I’ve got at least a year’s worth of artists I already want to interview before I’ll even likely look at them again).

Why do they get the cold shoulder? Because if I requested your material, I’ve got it on my watch list. I’ll know if it’s what I’ve requested, and frankly, I don’t like liars (ask any of my exes).

Some artists think they’re being “clever” by writing this on their press kit. They think it’s going to get them preferential treatment. That might work for a large publication if you’re trying to get past some sloppy intern. But eventually most of us figure out you’re full of… something. I know some publicists even recommend that you do this. They’re idiots.

So here’s your music marketing tip for the day: NEVER ever ever, under any circumstances lie to the people you want to review you, interview you, or simply not think of you as some dishonest publicity-seeking piece of sh*t. Don’t write “requested materials” on anything that wasn’t actually requested.


Jennifer Mattern - EditorThis article was written by Jennifer Mattern, founder and Editor of AudioXposure.com. To learn more about Jenn, please visit JH Mattern Communications.

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